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Advice from the BP Measurement Experts

Check out the latest Cardiac Stress Test Blood Pressure related blog articles. 

Can Music Improve Data from Stress BP Tests?

 

Man undergoing a Stress Blood Pressure Test

Anyone who has had a stress test knows that stress tests are not easy and can even be painful! The commonly-used Bruce protocol for treadmill exercise tests includes 7 stages of 3 minutes each. The first stage starts at a 10% grade at a speed of 1.7 miles per hour. Each stage increases by 2% and between 5-9 miles per hour. Even though a stress test can last for over 20 minutes, most people don't last longer than seven minutes on the treadmill. However, it is important to keep going as long as possible to collect lots of data and be sure to reach the target heart rate. Each additional minute of a stress test could yield important information about the heart's condition.

 

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5 Tips for Preparing for a Cardiac Stress Test

For accuracy purposes, some diagnostic tests require a little preparation on your part. So, what do you need to do before you have a cardiac stress test? According to a recent publication by the Heart and Vascular Team at the Cleveland Clinic, the following tips are good to know before you step on the treadmill:

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Cardiac Stress Tests Help Predict the Future

Picture of Heart in a Crystal Ball being held by a hand.

Let’s be honest, a cardiac stress test can be just that – stressful! So how do physicians know when it’s appropriate to use this as a way to evaluate how well a patient’s heart is handling its workload? Well, it’s actually by considering a few different factors. Is the patient healthy enough to walk on a treadmill or bike on an ergometer? What if the patient presents healthy, yet there is a family history of heart disease? After evaluating those parameters, the question then becomes which type of stress test [see previous blog] should the patient actually undergo? The good news - there may now be further guidance for physicians when it comes to making this decision, specifically for males who are at risk.

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When Physicians Should Be Present for Stress Testing

Picture of young woman on a treadmill performing a stress test under the supervision of a doctor.

When it comes to patient safety in stress labs, opinions run the gamut as to which clinicians actually need to be in the room during a cardiac stress test. Historically, it has been considered best practice to always have a physician present as those being tested are typically thought to be at risk of having some type of potential cardiovascular disease. And let’s face it – wouldn’t you want your doctor in the room in case something went wrong? But in today’s struggling economy, even stress labs are looking for ways to cut costs, and having a non-physician supervise a stress test if the patient is considered lower risk has become common practice.

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Relax...Tips for Accurate Cardiac Stress BP Measurement

Audio Series by SunTech MedicalWhen most people have their blood pressure (BP) taken, it’s typically done by a clinician in a physician’s office. A past blog post - 10 Factors That Can Affect Your BP Reading– discusses several factors which may influence your BP reading during these visits, which are usually conducted under routine or “normal” conditions. But what if you are having your BP taken under different circumstances such as during a cardiac stress test or ABPM study? Do these same factors still apply?


Well, yes and no. Accurate cuff size and placement are still critical; however, as a result of the motion and noise introduced during these tests, not all of the 10 factors still apply. For example, during a cardiac stress test, your body will be ‘stressed’ on purpose. It will be necessary for you to talk to your clinician about how you feel throughout the course of the assessment. Additionally, you will not have any support other than the bar of the treadmill or the Ergometer and there are not any significant ‘rest times’ between measurements. So, how do you collect an accurate BP in an environment such as this?

Follow these simple tips:

  • Relax the arm on which the BP cuff has been placed
  • Do not grip the bar of the treadmill or Ergometer
  • Stand up straight – no leaning on the rail
  • Follow instructions carefully for when cuff inflates

To request a free, digital copy with a complete list of tips, simply click the button below to get one today! (Available in English, French, Italian, German, Spanish, Czech, Polish, Dutch, Brazilian Portuguese, Turkish, Chinese, and Japanese)

 

 

 

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