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Advice from the BP Measurement Experts

Check out the latest Blood Pressure + Vitals Measurement related blogs.

Medical Billing Codes Gone Wild!

Orcas spit water at viewersHere on the SunTech blog, we normally aim to provide valuable clinical information and helpful tips related to all things blood pressure. But allow me to wax philosophical for a moment, because…well, you’ll see why.

Right. So, for many of us who work in health-care or a health-care related field, there is significant meaning to be found in doing a job that can positively affect people’s well-being. It’s great to wake up every day knowing that you will indirectly or directly help to cure illnesses, heal wounds, save lives, and treat burns due to water skis on fire…wait, huh?

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My blood pressure monitor isn’t working! It’s reading too high!

patienttechniqueIt’s one of the occasional issues we hear about BP monitors and automated BP technology, ours included.  And while it’s one of the reasons that we blog about the 10 Steps to Accurate Manual Blood Pressure Measurement and the 10 Factors That Can Affect Blood Pressure Readings, sometimes it takes more guidance to diagnose if a monitor is mis-reading.  Comparing BP measurements manually taken by an observer to those from a monitor is a common way of examining the accuracy of a monitor.  Clinical standards1 that determine a monitor's accuracy provide detailed methods for making these comparisons.  Unfortunately, there are so many things done to control the environment and patient in these standards tests that it is not realistically possible to replicate in clinical practice.  However, here are a few of the more important issues that Richard Prowse, our OEM sales manager for Europe, Middle East, and Africa, shares with his customers when they are investigating a monitor that might be reading high.

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Information Overload: Relevant BP Measurement Data

Overwhelmed DoctorI don’t know about you, but I am bombarded daily with more information than I can possibly process or make use of. Yet each day dawns requiring that I sift through it all, applying only what is relevant or helpful to me and my family, and at times the whole process can be exhausting. The miracle of the information age is also its curse. ‘Connected’ devices are proliferating at an astonishing pace, inexorably finding their way into our living rooms, dens, kitchens, bedrooms, vehicles, and belt clips. Not that this is necessarily a bad thing, but how many Twitter messages can a sane person realistically absorb in a given day? And more importantly, which ones are really useful?

This same phenomenon is happening today in health care...

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3 Practical Tips for Acquiring Representative BP Measurements

BP Measurement TipsQuite a lot has been said in clinical circles about the best way to assess a person’s blood pressure. Manual? Oscillometric? During office visits? At home? Over 24-hours? Average? Trend? Peak? At times, the debate has gotten pretty hot. In a recent issue of the journal Hypertension, Drs. George Stergiou and Gianfranco Parati published an editorial that proposes a more practical approach.

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Korotkoff Sounds vs. Oscillometric BP Measurement

sphygmomanometerOne thing we like to do at the SunTech blog is share debates and comparisons of automated vs. manual auscultatory blood pressure measurements. The latest comes from an article published in the Journal of the American Society of Hypertension earlier this year. This evaluation compared one particular automated oscillometric device with the results from the auscultatory method of listening for Korotkoff sounds during cuff deflation. The authors’ aim was to help readers better understand the fundamental differences between these two methods and illustrate how that might assist clinicians in effectively controlling and managing hypertensive patients.


Understanding that there is a dramatic difference between these two methods is, in fact, an important consideration of which clinicians should be aware. The auscultatory method has been the standard method of determining BP for over 100 years and relies on the observer to detect the audible sounds (Korotkoff sounds) that occur during constricted blood flow. The oscillometric method, employed by most clinical-grade automated BP devices, analyzes pulse waves collected from the cuff during constricted blood flow. In this case, the cuff is the sensor. The auscultatory and oscillometric methods are two very different approaches to determining the same vital sign.

Each method also presents its own unique set of challenges. The manual auscultatory method is prone to poor technique, observer digit bias and poor hearing (often unbeknownst to the observer). The oscillometric method can be prone to errors when there is too much patient arm movement.  In addition, each medical device manufacturer uses their own proprietary algorithm for acquiring blood pressure measurements so BP readings may vary significantly between devices which makes it important to shop around for a clinical grade device that is validated to industry standards such as the AAMI SP10 protocol.

Being aware of these differences and limitations can certainly be of help to clinicians when making hypertension treatment decisions. For further information on some of the challenges and best practices when taking an auscultatory blood pressure measurement, be sure to check out our e-book “10 Steps to Accurate Blood Pressure Measurement”. We also invite you to share your comments and experiences when comparing automated and manual BP measurements.

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