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Advice from the BP Measurement Experts

Check out the latest Blood Pressure + Vitals Measurement related blogs.

5 Myths About Vital Signs Automation and EHR's

Electronic Medical RecordsAnyone who has been a patient in a doctor’s office knows what it’s like to get their blood pressure (“hold still while I inflate this cuff”), body temperature (“put this under your tongue”), and weight (“don’t worry, I’m sure your clothes add a few pounds”) measured. Historically, the nurse would write all of the measurements down on a paper chart for the doctor to review, and the chart would later go into the patient’s permanent file. But really, paper and pen are so 20th Century. Aren’t they?

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3 Things to Consider When Measuring Your BP at a Kiosk

Valentine's Day Candy Box with StethoscopeThis Valentine's Day, when you are out making a mad dash to your local pharmacy for the perfect card, you may consider checking your blood pressure at the pharmacy's kiosk. We'd like to whisper sweet nothings in your ear about 3 things to consider while having your BP measurement taken at a kiosk.


While blood pressure checks have historically been standard at community health fairs and elder-care centers, the local branch of your bank is not necessarily where you expect a check up and reminder of tips on healthy living.  But with the trend in the US, the UK, and other countries of raising self-awareness for personal health, healthcare services and organizations are exploring new, proactive ways to bring simple services like education and monitoring to their communities. 

At a public shopping mall, Covenant Health has been running a multi-service kiosk, which uses automated BP monitors for self-measurement.  While this is not so different than the BP kiosks that have been in pharmacies, grocery stores, and other public places for many years, Wegmans, a grocery store chain in the east coast of the USA, understands that these health initiatives need to be supported by educational information and recommendations to see a clinician for credible, actionable diagnosis and treatment.  To aid in the education of this trend, the following are the top three factors to consider when you decide to have your blood pressure taken at a blood pressure kiosk:

  1. Remember that your blood pressure changes just like your heart rate.  Exert yourself by walking up the stairs or even just dealing with the stresses of the workplace, and your BP and heart rate may be higher than what you are used to seeing in a doctor’s office or at home.  Some level of this variability is normal.
  2. One measurement is just that… it’s one instance in time.  It’s one data point.  In fact, clinicians and experts in BP are increasingly placing more emphasis on the average of several measurements over a given period of time instead of focusing on just one measurement.  A single high measurement may be due to dealing with the stress of being in a public place like the mall or being sick.
  3. BP measurement is like any diagnostic test.  It’s not always 100% accurate. While there are standards that BP monitors, including kiosks, must meet in order to be sold on the market, automated BP devices are not fool-proof.  Some of the factors that affect BP measurements are covered in other blog posts:

Given these factors, it’s important to take the right perspective when you have your BP measured in a public place.  In fact, one group who studied the use of a public access kiosk found that over 70% of users had high blood pressure.  While this might be alarming, they came to the following balanced, sensible conclusions:

“These statistics clearly illustrate the heart-health challenges facing our city… However, they also show that the population of people using these downtown kiosks beat the national average in terms of blood pressure. The Wellness Stations are terrific tools in helping people gauge their own health.”

In the end, engaging people about their health in their daily lives is the goal, one for which kiosks may serve as a cost-effective solution.

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Determining BP Device Accuracy: Who Has It Right?

Bullseye Dart on a Manual StethoscopeAll caregivers need to trust the accuracy of automated blood pressure (BP) devices they use to make clinical decisions. But when considering one specific BP device versus another, how does one establish that trust? Well, an automated BP device that’s used to guide patient treatment is legally considered a medical device, and therefore must adhere to the regulatory guidelines for the markets in which it is sold.

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Deflating Expectations

deflateWe’ve written quite a bit here on the SunTech blog about BP technique. And guess what? We’re going to talk about it again! Maybe it’s not the most fascinating topic in the world of non-invasive blood pressure, but I think there are few as important to the successful treatment of high blood pressure. I must not be the only one, because studies that look at blood pressure technique continue to be published at a pretty good clip.

One of the more recent ones is aptly titled, “Blood Pressure Monitoring Technique Impacts Hypertension Treatment”. Authored by Ray et al and published in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, this study compared the way that BP’s are normally taken during triage check-in on a population of 40 patients at the New Mexico Hospital Adult Internal Medicine Clinic. A study investigator observed the technique used by the clinician, and then took the patient’s BP using the AHA recommendations for blood pressure measurement published in 2005.

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Has My Physician Measured My BP in Both Arms?

Doctor taking a BP measurementThat’s the question I pondered while reading an article published earlier this year in the American Journal of Hypertension. In the article “Blood Pressure Measurement Method and Inter-Arm Difference: A Meta-Analysis,"* the authors reviewed studies where BP was measured in both the left and right arm of subjects. The results showed that on average, Systolic pressures differ by 5.4 mmHg between arms while Diastolic pressures showed an average inter-arm difference of 3.6 mmHg.

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